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Tauriko School Welcomes International Students

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Wednesday, 7 June 2017

School in 1900's

International Student Manager
It was an absolute pleasure taking our International Students on a trip to the Western Bay of Plenty Museum. Students got to experience school-life in the early 1900's.

Students got to dress up in clothing that children would have worn back in the 1900's. They were then 'students' in a typical classroom, and the teachers did an excellent job acting like teachers from the 1900's!

Children learnt a lot about the history of Katikati, and got to use old tools to drill holes into wood, cut wood, make butter, and make scones on the old coal stove... these were delicious!

It was a real pleasure having the parents join us.

Bubbles on ME!

International Student Manager
Our younger children spend time focusing on different letters of the alphabet - they learn the letter, the sound it makes, words beginning with that letter ... they put these words in sentences, and practise reading and saying new words aloud.

B is for Bubbles!

Students loved blowing bubbles - and learnt all about prepositions at the same time! On, over, under, through, behind, beside, above, on top ...

Students read a book called 'Off goes the hose' "water on the window, water on the clothes, water on grandma... OFF goes the hose'. Students then wrote their own book about bubbles, and took photos of where their bubbles landed. They then wrote sentences to go with each photo "bubbles on the playground, bubbles on the slide, bubbles on the chair, bubbles on my hand, bubbles on ME!"

Shake shake shake ... Butter!

International Student Manager
More Science in the ESOL classroom ... what a way to get students talking - science experiments provide authentic learning experiences for the children, and provide a rich oral language opportunity.

What is the difference between milk and cream?
Where does milk and cream come from?
What is milk and cream made up of? (Water and fat)

Students loved making butter! Students needed only two things: cream, and a jar with a lid.

Students had to shake the cream (for a very long time!). Students were very fascinated to observe the changes that they could see - liquid turning solid! Lots of descriptive language was shared, and many lovely adjectives were used to describe what could be seen, felt, smelt, heard and tasted!

I wonder if any students have made butter at home yet? This activity was completed prior to our International Student excursion to the Western Bay of Plenty Museum. Students were provided with this experience to 'pre-teach' them language and concepts that would encounter at the Museum.






Alumni Students - Welcome Back to Tauriko School

International Student Manager
We were absolutely thrilled to have Ha Nee, Jarang, Arang, Geong-Ung and Chang-Ung visit us at school. These students studied with us in 2016, and because of their positive school experience, they have chosen to return to the sunny Bay of Plenty in 2017 to further their studies.

It was an absolute pleasure hosting these students and their parents for afternoon tea. The students were joined by their special Kiwi friends, who shared an afternoon of games, activities and laughter together with their International friends.

The International Students even surprised their old teachers at a special staff meeting - students thanked their teachers and and explained what an impact their kindness, love and care had on their lives. The teachers were so happy to see their old students return - and many cried tears of happiness!

We appreciate International Students and the cultural value they bring to our school, just as much as the International Students appreciate us, their teachers.

We love keeping in touch with our Alumni families.

Cross Country 2017

International Student Manager
A very big congratulations to all of our International Students for their participation in Tauriko School's Cross Country. 

We are very proud of you


Learning through Science

International Student Manager
Students have been very busy extending themselves through engaging in Scientific experiments. These experiments were inspired by books the children had read during ESOL, specifically relating to boats and the concept of floating and sinking.

Younger students named objects and tested out whether these would float or sink - a lot of conversation went on!

The older children formed their own hypotheses and made predictions about which objects they thought would float or sink, and explained why. These items were categorized based on the children's predictions, then re-categorized upon completing the experiment and reflecting on what happened.

Some great language development and extension went on here, which was further reinforced in the children's writing (following the model of 'statement, explanation, example').

Staff

  • Suzanne BillingtonPrincipal
  • Laura FlemingInternational Student Manager
  • Cathy CampbellESOL Learning Programme